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Stephen King Wants Netflix To Make A New Adaptation Of 'Under the Dome'

The original series was screened on CBS between 2013 and 2015.

Salem's Lot, The Tommyknockers, Dead Zone, Haven, 22.11.63, The Mist, Mr. Mercedes, Castle Rock… We've lost count of all the series adapted from Stephen King's novels since the late 1970s. But among this plethora of good and bad TV productions, one in particular left its mark on our generation from 2013 to 2015: Under the Dome. The adaptation was widely criticized and the American novelist would now like to see his novel re-adapted for the small screen once again. 

Stephen King tagged Netflix on his Twitter account to propose the project, making a little dig at the previous team. He criticizes the screenwriting by Brian K. Vaughan then by showrunner Neal Baer following the departure of the former, as both writers took a number of liberties with the original novel for the CBS show.

That said, the author of Under the Dome isn't really being too fair. First of all, because the series achieved record audience numbers when it was launched in June 2013, becoming the most-watched summer drama since 1992 across all networks. And secondly, because the first season received pretty good reviews and CBS paid out a lot of money (around 3 million dollars per episode in Season 1) to bring the project to life.  

Finally, Stephen King was a consultant on the three seasons of the show, even signing the script for the first episode of Season 2. Shortly after the launch of Under the Dome in 2013, the author justified the modifications made in the series on his blog, explaining that the team had added a number of plot twists because "it would spoil things if you guys knew the arcs of the characters in advance".

King hasn't yet worked with Netflix, so there's every chance that we might be seeing the novelist among the platform's roster of authors, which already features prestigious names such as Ryan Murphy and Shonda Rhimes. 

 

Article translated by: Eleanor Staniforth

By Adrien Delage, published on 18/06/2019

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