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Ben & Jerry's Fights For CBD To Be Authorized As A Food Additive With A New Ice Cream

The Vermont brand just keeps on innovating...

Since hemp cultivation was authorized in the United States in 2018, products containing less than 0.3 % THC are allowed to be sold at the federal level. As for CBD, the non-psychoactive molecule from the plant, legalization for dietary purposes is still being debated.

CBD or cannabidiol is "a hemp molecule which has no narcotic effect", explains Fanny Huboux, Head of the Legal Mission at the Interministerial Mission for the Fight Against Drugs and Addictive Behaviour. However, it does have relaxing properties and is able to reduce stress, making it more and more popular. In response to the popularity of the product, American brand Ben & Jerry's has created a CBD ice cream which it hopes to be able to sell soon.

For Fans' Pleasure

In an article published on their website, Ben & Jerry’s explains that they created the new flavour in response to demand from fans. The brand quotes a survey carried out by the National Restaurant Association which shows that 3 in 4 chefs believe CBD is one of the upcoming trends of 2019. 

"We’re doing this for our fans. We’ve listened and brought them everything from Non-Dairy indulgences to on-the-go portions with our Pint Slices. We aspire to love our fans more than they love us and we want to give them what they’re looking for in a Ben & Jerry’s way," explains Matthew McCarthy, CEO of the company.

Complex Legislation

However, the FDA hasn't yet ruled on the addition of CBD to food and drinks products. On May 31, a public hearing was held by the agency, at which Ben & Jerry's came out in favor of legalization, inviting fans of the brand to participate by contacting the FDA directly via the institution's website by July 2 2019. 

It could take several years for CBD to be approved for use in food products, but if it does come about at the federal level, Ben & Jerry’s has promised to sell its CBD ice cream made from quality plants cultivated in Vermont. 

 

Article translated by: Eleanor Staniforth

By Claire Verriele, published on 07/06/2019

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