(Photo: Capitol Films)

9 Out Of 10 Students Have Now Registered To Vote

A huge surge of students registering to vote – many of whom are intent on voting for Labour – could change the outcome of the impending general election.

According to a newly unveiled survey seen by the Guardian, nine out of 10 students who are eligible to register to vote have done so in light of news of the snap election. The survey found that 93% of students polled said they plan on using their vote on June 8.

This is symbolic, considering the unfavourable rep us young Brits have when it comes to voting – and the surge in registrations could play a significant part in the general election result.

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(Photo: Capitol Films)

(Photo: Capitol Films)

Seeing as student support for Jeremy Corbyn's Labour has risen from 23% in 2015 to 55% in 2017, the red party's vote count is likely to rise with student registrations.

More than half of students surveyed said they would vote for the Labour Party if a general election was held tomorrow, while only one out of six would vote for the Conservative Party. Meanwhile, only 12% of students currently support the Lib Dems, who were once the most popular party among university-goers. The survey also found that of those polled, 6% would vote for the Greens, the SNP 3% and Ukip 2%.

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Critics warn that this poll doesn't mean more Labour votes are guaranteed – given the attention being paid to Brexit in election campaigns, people who are concerned about leaving the EU are expected to vote tactically.

(Image: Guardian)

(Image: Guardian)

Young people are more likely to be liberal thinkers and vote towards the left, whereas older voters who make up a larger part of the electorate, are thought to be more right-leaning.

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YouGov analysis suggests that the current tipping point, for the age where voters are more likely to favour the Conservatives instead Labour, is 34. This means that for every 10 years older a voter becomes, their chance of voting Tory increases by approximately 8%, according to YouGov.

These figures are interesting, considering how infamous young people are for being ambivalent to politics and that over 65s make up such a significant part of the UK electorate.

This is mainly because political apathy in the 18-24 voter age group has paved the way for the advent of tuition fees and cuts to housing benefits and student grants.

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But if this survey is right, perhaps this age-old tradition will end in favour of British youth. If nine out of 10 students and everyone else in the 18-24 category end up voting in the general election, politicians will get a kick in the butt and finally attempt to represent young people and the policies we want and need.

Please, if you haven't already, register to vote.

More details on voting and how to make your vote count if you are a student can be found here.

Read More -> The Greens have called for a second EU referendum: who's down?

By Lydia Morrish, published on 04/05/2017