A still from Bruce & Jane (Image: SMYS)

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The Artist Turning Your Sexy Texts Into NSFW Short Films

Sexting isn't exactly high on smartphone sexy time priorities, now that Snapchat, Insta-DMs and FaceTime quickies are at our finger's reach. But what if you could turn your "bbe, take ur clothes off for me" from last night's convo with bae into legit video art?

Radically aware of the gap in the market for artsy, lo-fi movie remakes of lusted-up young couples' sexy text threads and inspired by the unrelenting creativity when it comes to sexting, indie documentary maker Eileen Yaghoobian (and your new 'sexty' BFF) started sendmeyoursexts.com two years ago. The pay-for-service now has a new series, where she's adapting dirty message submissions for your enjoyment.

After essentially going viral in the internet corners, SMYS videos are (surprisingly) void of actual nudity; instead Yaghoobian opts for suggestive situations and dirty talk with a little dry-humping in place for what would be ~graphic sex~ to counter the consumerist porn world. And the results are audacious, absurd and hilarious; but that doesn't mean you shouldn't see the web videos as turn-ons.

The first fornication episode of the new series stars sexters Bruce and Jane, who effectively compare their bodies and sexual desires. With grave typos, flirty photos and filthy language, sexting has never been so top-grade.

(Image: SMYS)

(Image: SMYS)

Konbini: What inspired you to start SMYS?

Eileen Yaghoobian: I was inspired by my own experience sexting and sharing! What I love about sexting myself is that you have to be really creative. I was sharing my sexts with my friends and then the conversation led to “it would be funny to see this come to life!” It's unexplored territory and endless fun and the material is hilarious. You can’t make this stuff up.

Sexts are the perfect inspiration: they are current, contemporary, and filled with creativity, tension, real drama and humour. Most importantly, they are authentic and raw.

When you’re sexting, you’re not actually having sex but you want to. You could be having sex and sexting at the same time. A lot of people who are in relationships are sexting other people. It’s like watching porn for some people. Some people get off at the sext stage and not even get to sex – endless fun!

Why sexts and not, say, emails?

I love it that you can be in a public space and still very private. Email is a longer form more like a letter or a monologue. The space between sext messages is very much part of being mobile and fast vs something that is static and longer form like email, which helps in bringing the sexts to life.

You are free to confess your desires all the time even when you’re sexting because you’re not in the same physical space. It’s like hanging at 7/11 and you can have 24/7 slurpees and change the flavours whenever you want – unlimited fun!

A still from Bruce & Jane (Image: SMYS)

A still from Bruce & Jane (Image: SMYS)

What have you discovered about modern love from the project?

The way you express your desires changes with tech. And you can be vulnerable to scrutiny because of the language you use or the platform you use or the way you use the language with technology.

But that’s the part that I’m interested in with Send Me Your Sexts – the wonderful language of sexting and the video reenactments are, in a way, an interpretation of digital intimacy to an analogue form. 

What does your project say about how people connect in a mediated and monitored society?

Sexting helps communication and it doesn’t. Just as technology has made it easier to break up by ghosting, it’s also easy to have a sexting life that really doesn’t exist. Technology is both hyper-visible and invisible. Our engagement with sexual messages and images lives within the ambiguity between fantasy and reality.

I'm interested in the tension created by the intersection of the tech part and sexts. The Dylan and Kacey [episode] is so much about private spaces in public places and the intersection of tech and sex.

"Most people use sexting as social currency"

 

Sexting is for sharing and unfortunately sometimes stealing. It’s all about who you choose to sext and what they do with it. Everyone sexts and wants privacy, but at the same time, they want to share their secret. Most people use sexting as social currency… like your collecting people’s sexual interest in you and you want to brag to your friends about it.

If people didn’t care about sharing then shaming culture would go away. Like in the news recently some hockey guy was blackmailed and he didn’t care. I don’t think anyone should care or made to feel like they should care if they sext or if their sexts have gone viral or whatever.

A still from Ted & Holly (Image: SMYS)

A still from Ted & Holly (Image: SMYS)

How has the rise of Snapchat (and other, less text based sexy communications) in that time altered the submissions?

Not so much yet but I do want the project to grow and am open to all of it! We do play in the reenactments with emoji messages – we have the actors play out the emoji but I’m excited about the tech changes to come and what we do with them is going to be exciting!  

Your films aren’t straight up porn, but why did you choose to make them über sexy?

Sexting is sexy! Sexts are the best sex of your mind. And sex or being sexy is part of the intent for the sexters! The 'sexy' words people choose in verbalizing their sexual fantasies are fascinating and say a lot about their character and intent in the text choices people make. The act of verbalising a sexy text message to turn someone on and the lack of sex in the back and forth... I mean you can talk sexy when you’re having sex, but to talk sexy in a text in order to get to the act of sex is something else.

It just depends on the characters, some people love dirty talk and are good at it, and some love to be a tease and suck at talk. But the tech part of sexting gives people the freedom to be the dirty talking self they never thought they could be in real life – and that’s the part that interests me.

Whatever turns me kinda on and off becomes part of the story but it’s important that the fantasy fits the text it’s important that we stay true to the sexter’s intent in the text. 

"You can be funny and sexy and running on both those lines at the same time"

 

Did you specifically want the videos to be funny?

Yes because sex can be funny and digital sex talk is funnier! I don't think there are enough websites out there that are both sexy and funny but not necessarily porn. SMYS is sexy and funny. And it’s even better if someone gets turned on watching these funny videos because we’re sexy but not naked and not porn!

All the things that are in sexting are kind of default funny but I also think just the act of sex itself is kind of awkward and can be funny; funny is sexy to me. You can be funny and sexy and running on both those lines at the same time. Like SNL, but I want SMYS to be Sexy SNL.

What’s the most memorable submission you’ve received?

There is one about crack that I haven’t made yet and it starts off by him saying "First off, you are positively lovely..." and it ends with him describing smoking crack off a part of her body.

She responds "I don't smoke crack…"

To send Eileen your sexts (for $80) head to her website

Read More - > A 'reversible birth control' for men is coming in 2018

By Lydia Morrish, published on 30/03/2016