Street Artist Biancoshock Turns Quaint Italian Village Into An IRL Internet

Those lucky enough to live in big cities - where wifi is plentiful and your iPhone connects at the drop of a hat - are accustomed to a certain way of life. But in small, remote villages there is life beyond the internet.

Civitacampomarano in the province of Campobasso, Italy is a tiny medieval hamlet with a mere 400 inhabitants, most of which are elderly. The internet is basically non-existent, phone reception is difficult to get, and mobile data is unheard of, and yet people get on just fine. 

That's why street artist Biancoshock chose it for his latest project. Titled “Web 0.0” in honor of the CVTa Street Fest as a commentary on our dependancy on the internet, the series is an ironic look at how culture and information can still pass from person to person with no internet.

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

"The provocative idea is to show that these virtual functions, considered by the vast majority of the population as necessary and essential to everyday life, also exist in the country, where the connection is hard to reach," says Bianchosock. "It is a sort of Internet "in real life" able to demonstrate that in traditions and popular culture these instruments, in other ways, have always existed and have allowed people and families to have cultural exchanges, meeting at the bar and living the town's streets."

Twitter is a quick conversation between two people at a bus stop, Wikipedia is the village's wise storyteller, Gmail is an old fashioned mailbox and Facebook is the town bulletin board - just to name a few. 

Biancoshock uses a seemingly dead community as his playground for a commentary on the border between past and present: the geographical isolation of the village where the internet is unheard of and the mental isolation of those who are always connected.

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

(Photo: Biancoshock)

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