The Fearless Faces Of David Bowie’s Most Daring Looks

David Bowie is dead but his legacy will prevail. Not only has he left family, friends and fans decades worth of some of the world's most influential albums, but the king of self-invention propelled innovative, raucous and fearless fashion, cementing him as the most daring musical style icon ever.

From mod teen and disheveled hippy to glam glitterati and gender-bending king, Bowie has reinvented his style more intensely than any other. His self-inspired transformations have impelled enormous cultural shifts, creating a path to ruthless self-expression and rebellious individuality which many followed and adored.

When it came to style, David Bowie was the most daring, inventive and non-conformist ever. (Photo: Masayoshi Sukita)

When it came to style, David Bowie was the most daring, inventive and non-conformist in music history. (Photo: Masayoshi Sukita)

Mod-like marvel

Before any sartorial disruption, Bowie's clothing roots read like this: dapper, tailored and shamelessly elegant. His sophisticated youth style isn't to be mistaken for normal though – reportedly he initiated a trend for tapered pants at school.

As Bowie fell into the musical universe with his band The Buzz in the mid-60s, he was the perfect picture of the chic mod wardrobe donned by many young men at the time. His early years weren't void of stylistic innovation though – he used food coloring as hair dye, predicating his future full of that orange mullet.

(Photo: Getty)

Bowie, then Davy Jones, on March 3, 1965, rocking a Warhol-esque mop (Photo: Getty)

(Photo: Getty)

January 1, 1965, rocking on the guitar (Photo: Getty)

(Photo: Getty)

At Wembley Studios in March 1966, with his band The Buzz (Photo: Getty)

(Photo: Getty)

Posing for Boyfriend magazine, Summer 1963 (Photo: Getty)

On a TV show in 1967 (Photo: Nico van der Stam)

On a TV show in 1967 (Photo: Nico van der Stam)

Gender-bending glam glitterati

The closure of the Summer of Love in the 70s saw Bowie's most seismic character invade pop culture, sparking the next generation of his career as Ziggy Stardust. An androgynous alien, this chapter of rock 'n' roll delight was inspired by abundant cultural references and allowed David to immerse himself in the world of glitz on-stage.

Championing platform heels, glam rock make-up and a roaring palette of seemingly endless color, Ziggy epitomized sex appeal (for men and women) and welcomed fluid fashion to the masses. The looks that aligned with the release of The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (1972) and Aladdin Sane (1973) only highlight further that this non-conformist may as well have invented gender neutral dressing.

(Photo: Getty)

In pure nonchalance, Bowie had a penchant for high heels. (Photo: Getty)

Bowie was pretty into a slash of eyeliner. (Photo: Rex)

Bowie was pretty into a slash of eyeliner. (Photo: Rex)

Clacks, bell-bottoms and those luscious locks epitomise his angrogynous tendencies. (Photo: Michael Ochs Archives)

Slacks, blouses and those luscious locks epitomize his androgynous tendencies. (Photo: Michael Ochs Archives)

Bowie's glam rock make-up looks still inspire today. (Photo: Getty)

Bowie's glam rock make-up looks still inspire today. (Photo: Getty)

Promoting his third album, The Man Who Sold The World in June 1972 (Photo: Rex)

Promoting his third album, "The Man Who Sold The World" in June 1972 (Photo: Rex)

The androgynous alien king left Blackstar as a final farewell. (Photo: Masayoshi Sukita

In an iconic photoshoot with Japanese photographer Masayoshi Sukita (Photo: Masayoshi Sukita)

By Mick Rock, who photographed Bowie more than anyone else, in 1972 (Photo: Mick Rock)

By Mick Rock, who photographed Bowie more than anyone else, in 1972 (Photo: Mick Rock)

A god-like backstage shot by Mick Rock (Photo: Mick Rock)

A god-like backstage shot by Mick Rock (Photo: Mick Rock)

Undying rockstar

Into the late 70s and early 80s, Bowie's sense of adventure didn't slow, taking acting spots and creating The Man Who Sold The World. Blending the avant-garde with bold statement pieces and chic modern minimalism, his fashions progressed with him. When off-duty, Bowie clothed himself in trench coats, polo necks, angular glasses and anything black and grey.

The world has lost a legend, but we'll never be void of him. David Bowie's extra-terrestrial essence pushes on in all areas of culture and will never fade.

This signature mustard suit is but one of his famous block-coloured emsembles. (Photo via bowiepills.tumblr.com)

This signature canary yellow suit is but one of his famous block-colored emsembles. (Photo via bowiepills.tumblr.com)

David Bowie in 1974 wearing braces and leather boots (Photo: Terry O'Neil)

David Bowie in 1974 wearing braces and leather boots (Photo: Terry O'Neil)

The photo that influenced a thousand mullets (Photo: Rex)

The mid-70s photo that influenced a thousand mullets (Photo: Rex)

Donning simple wire-framed glasses in a shoot with Helmut Newton in 1981 (Photo: Helmut Newton)

Donning angular wire-framed glasses and a workwear jumpsuit in a shoot with Helmut Newton in 1982 (Photo: Helmut Newton)

Effortless... Bowie doing minimal correctly in 1994 (Photo: Richard Young/Rex Features)

Effortless... Bowie doing minimal correctly in 1994 (Photo: Richard Young/Rex Features)

Bowie in 2002 for V Magazine proving he can even age well. (Photo: Mario Testino/V)

Bowie in 2002 for V Magazine proving even age doesn't hinder his style. (Photo: Mario Testino/V)

Read More - > David Bowie’s last album was a planned farewell to loyal fans

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