Artist Pokes Fun At Our Drug Addiction With Fake Drug Nutrition Labels

In today’s modern age there seems to be a drug on the market for anything that ails us.

In Score, artist Daniel Allen Cohen turns his attention to the rising consumption of drugs in America with an irreverent commentary on the subject through a series of pieces that feature familiar and made-up drugs in conjunction with their nutrition label. Cohen shared with Konbini:

"Our culture is so obsessed with finding an answer to a problem. You go see a doctor, get a prescription and problem solved. There are too many drugs out there." 

While he agrees that the drug epidemic is a serious one, Cohen chose instead to take a unique and light-hearted approach to drug use by exploring their humorous side.

The Los Angeles-based artist recreated drugs such as cannabis and cocaine alongside nutrition labels that list out the ingredients and effects of each recreational drug.

"Contains 100% Cannabis. Ingredients: Love, partying, watching Netflix, giving zero fucks..."

Cloud 9 by Daniel Allen Cohen

(Photo: Daniel Allen Cohen)

The series came to fruition when Cohen went on a three month cleanse:

"I started to think about and look at all the nutritional facts of what I was eating. I researched to see if anyone had done the nutritional facts on narcotics, and nobody had done it.

I only do positive drugs. I'm not focusing on crack or heroin.

It's a balancing act on a tight rope you don’t want to be on one side or the other, but it’s really about shedding light on the true humor of drugs we consume and their side effects."

No doubt the slight packaging shift in assigning a nutrition label to these drugs are very eye-catching and upon closer inspection, the label information does produce some chuckles, especially for those familiar with the effects of said drugs.

"Contains 100% Winning. Ingredients: partying, late nights, rock star mentality..."

White Horse by Daniel Allen Cohen

(Photo: Daniel Allen Cohen)

The research for Score entailed a combination of things: Cohen's first-hand experience with some of the drugs he tried in the past and those he specifically tried for the collection. He also researched online to see what other people’s experiences have been.

"People have gotten a kick out of this. There was an older lady who bought three of my pieces and she wasn’t really worried about what other people would think if she had pieces that are drug related up in her home.

There are those that love them but feel they cant put it up in their home because of the kids. The fact that they would want it if they did not have kids is still great to hear. I understand."

The process that goes behind Score is a very tedious and meticulous one. He doesn't just profile ubiquitous drugs, Cohen also takes it upon himself to invent drugs for what he describes as "first world problems," such as the craving to be famous on social media, the yearning to be rich and beautiful.

There are the "Insta-Fame" pills that are printed with social media icons and the “Designer Drugs" inscribed with luxury brand logos.

"Become famous with 8 tablets"

daniel-allen-cohen-drug-artwork-4

(Photo: Daniel Allen Cohen)

"Look better than everyone else with just 8 tablets"

Designer Drugs by Daniel Allen Cohen

(Photo: Daniel Allen Cohen)

Want to be rich? There's a Cohen pill for that!  The "Poor and Suffering relief" pills, his personal favorite in the series, cleverly features money to depict the pills that will cure empty bank accounts.

"Conceptually I love to create things that are special and different. That piece takes about 8 to 12 hours to make each one. I take shreds of $100 and I pick the best parts to hand spiral them into gel capsules."

The year-long project is still going with Cohen constantly adding new pieces. "I'm working on a whole series that is similar to Score but it will focus on the surgeon general warning labels," he tells us.

Check out Cohen's entire Score collection and purchase his work here.

"Poverty reliever + lavishness"

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(Photo: Daniel Allen Cohen)

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