These Women Threw An 'Anti-Victoria's Secret Show' Because Eff Stereotypes

Victoria's Secret has undeniably tried to up its inclusivity and diversity, especially after facing enormous backlash for its 2017 #whatissexy list that included mostly white people. However, the lingerie giant is once again under fire for not including any plus-size – or at least average size – models in their fashion show, and we can't say it comes as a surprise.

At this point, the company should really ditch its outdated beliefs that only tall, bony models can don their overpriced bras, panties and tacky angel wings. But its efforts to do so are, at best, meager. That's why we need initiatives like this "anti-Victoria's Secret runway show" more than ever!

Created by sisters Alyse and Lexi Scaffidi, both of which are fitness and lifestyle influencers promoting body confidence and inclusivity, the anti-Victoria's Secret show is here to prove "any woman can be an angel." The sisters agree they were inspired to throw such an event after watching Victoria's Secret runway show last year. They told the Huffington Post:

"We actually came up with the idea during last year’s VS Fashion Show, as we were sitting there mesmerized by the spectacular fashion designs. We wanted to be angels ourselves, but we knew that wouldn’t be possible."

While Alyse and Lexi both have stunningly toned figures, they understand there are other limitations preventing them from ever becoming a Victoria's Secret angel. So they had to take the matters into their own hands.

"Recreating the VS Fashion Show was our chance to make 21 girls' dream of being a runway angel come true, and in the process, we hope to inspire body confidence amongst other women."

Scaffidis' fashion show was a true celebration of inclusivity: from a woman in a wheelchair to an amputee, a cancer survivor and a model with dwarfism, all "angels" confidently strutted the runway showing off there's nothing wrong with being different.

To all the haters and skeptics, Alyse explains, "the show was not about celebrating obesity or anorexia, it’s about breaking away from a stereotypical look of what is beautiful and celebrating who you are as a person."

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