Artist Exposes Sexism By Switching Up Gender Roles In Old-School Ads

In the 1950s, the image of the perfect household consisted a hardworking wife slaving away to keep her home spick-and-span and her husband delighted. In the iconic ads of the time, everything is bright, clean, shiny... and filled to the brim with outrageous sexism, subservience and even conjugal violence. 

With mass communication reaching new heights, that's exactly how the ideal woman was sold to millions of people across the world. While these explicitly misogynistic representations are no longer allowed (most of the time, at least), we are still battling the sexist attitudes that they encouraged. Which is why one artist has decided to switch things up.

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

Taking inspiration from real-life campaigns from decades past, Eli Rezkallah has created a new series of fictional ads reversing the classic gender roles. 

The fine-art photographer and founder of Plastik Magazine came up with the idea for the series after overhearing his uncles announcing at Thanksgiving dinner that women were better off fulfilling "their womanly duties" in the kitchen. 

"Although I know that not all men like my uncles think that way I was surprised to learn that some still do," he explains. "So I went on to imagine a parallel universe, where roles are inverted and men are given a taste of their own sexist poison."

The result is this photo series which outlines the sheer absurdity of the outdated mentalities while also highlighting the importance of battling gender stereotypes that continue to exist. Check it out below.

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)

(Image: Eli Rezkallah for Plastik Studios 2018)