National Geographic Reveals Its 2017 Nature Photographer Of The Year

Each year, National Geographic organizes a series of prestigious competitions in order to discover a new generation of photographers. After celebrating the best travel snaps of the year a few months ago, the magazine has now unveiled its Nature Photographer of the Year

Beating around 11,000 other entries, Singapore-native Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan was awarded the 2017 Grand Prize after wowing the judges with his stunning photo of an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia's Tanjung Puting National Park.

A male orangutan peers from behind a tree while crossing a river in Borneo, Indonesia. Rampant palm oil cultivation threatens this critically endangered ape, forcing the normally arboreal species to resort to unusual behavior—such as wading through crocodile-infested rivers—in order to survive. (Photo & caption: Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan/National Geographic Your Shot)

In addition to the $10,000 prize, Bojan's work will be featured in an upcoming edition of National Geographic, as well as on the magazine's Instagram page.

Standing in five feet of water when the snap was taken, the photographer described the moment to the magazine:

"Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you."

Among the other finalists are Karim Iliya with a photo of a Hawaiian volcano eruption – which came out top in the 'Landscape' category – and Jim Obester's 'Underwater' win for a photo of an anemone. 

Finally, Todd Kennedy was awarded best 'Aerial' image for his photo of a Sydney rock pool at high tide. Showcasing the incredible diversity of our planet, the photographs have given us a serious case of wanderlust. We'll let you admire the rest for yourselves.

In Sydney, Australia, the Pacific Ocean at high tide breaks over a natural rock pool enlarged in the 1930s. Avoiding the crowds at the city’s many beaches, a local swims laps. (Photo & caption: Todd Kennedy/National Geographic Your Shot)

Shortly before twilight in Kalapana, Hawai’i, a fragment of the cooled lava tube broke away, leaving the molten rock to fan in a fiery spray for less than half an hour before returning to a steady flow. (Photo & caption: Karim Ilya/National Geographic Your Shot)

Blue-filtered strobe lights stimulate fluorescent pigments in the clear tentacles of a tube-dwelling anemone in Hood Canal, Washington. (Photo & caption: Jim Obester/National Geographic Your Shot)

An aerial shot of Metasequoia trees. (Photo: Jade Snow/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Yuhan Liao/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Shane Gross/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Alejandro Prieto/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Greg C./National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Mike Olbinski/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Michael O’Neill/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Bence Mate/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: David Swindler/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Lance McMillan/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Agathe Bernard/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Gheorghe Popa/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Jennifer O’Neil/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Wojciech Kruczynski/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Matthew Smith/National Geographic Your Shot)

(Photo: Harry Collins/National Geographic Your Shot)