These Photos Of Storms On Jupiter Look Just Like Van Gogh Paintings

Launched back in 2011, Nasa's Juno spacecraft has been busily working away in the attempt to better our understanding of one of the mysterious planets known to man: Jupiter.

Possibly the oldest planet in our solar system, the gas giant has been under scrutiny for a while but it's only in the past year that Juno's high-tech cameras managed to grab the following close-up snaps of activity on its surface.

As Colossal reports, the photos show the planet's gaseous composition which appears as swirling blue and brown clouds – the stunning results of which are weirdly reminiscent of a 19th-century Post-Impressionist painting. 

(Photo: Nasa)

Each pixel in the above image is equivalent to 7.75 miles, and it was captured when Juno was just 11,747 miles above the clouds. As Nasa notes, these types of photos are far from common as very specific conditions are required to capture them:

"Because of the Juno-Jupiter-Sun angle when the spacecraft captured this image, the higher-altitude clouds can be seen casting shadows on their surroundings. The behavior is most easily observable in the whitest regions in the image, but also in a few isolated spots in both the bottom and right areas of the image." 

Fully aware of the artistic potential of its shots, Nasa has decided to post a series of royalty free images in order for us all to enjoy them as we like.

The agency has even gone so far as to set up its an image processing gallery in order for you to download the photos and upload your own creations. You can get involved right here

(Photo: Nasa)

(Photo: Nasa)

(Photo: Nasa)

(Photo: Nasa)

(Photo: Nasa)

(Photo: Nasa)

(Photo: Nasa)