Company Hunts For 'Mystery Woman' Who Tried To Recycle An Apple 1 Worth $200,000

They say that one man's trash is another man's treasure, however, for one 60-year old woman who mistakenly tried to recycle a very rare Apple 1, she almost accidentally destroyed a piece of computing history.

The lady, thought to be in her 60s, dropped off boxes of electronics to be recycled by a local Silicon Valley recycling firm back in April after cleaning out her garage. Among other odds and ends the recyclers from CleanBayArea in Milpitas, California discovered that the boxes of computer parts contained an Apple 1 computer.

Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs with the Apple I in 1976.

Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs with the Apple I in 1976.

The recycling firm sold the rare computer for $200,000 in a private auction, however it is their policy to split the profits 50/50 with whoever donated the goods, meaning that the search is on for the mystery woman is on.

Built by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in 1976, the Apple 1 was originally sold for $666.66 each, however now only a handful of the groundbreaking home computers are known to still exist meaning that depending on their condition, they can sell extraordinarily well at auction.

Speaking to NBC news about the discovery, CleanBayArea Vice president Victor Gichun, who remembers what the woman looks like, said:

 

We thought it was fake. It was real. Tell this lady to please come over to our warehouse in Milpitas again, and we’ll give her a check for $100,000.

 

Apple merchandise and technology has seen a vast rise in value over recent years. On December 13, 2014, a couple sold a fully functioning, early Apple 1 at auction for $365,000 by auction house Christie's. The sale included a keyboard, custom case, original manual, which they had reportedly purchased in July 1976 from Steve Jobs in his parents' garage in Los Altos.

Bet you wished your Grandma lived near Silicon Valley now didn't you...

Complete and incomplete sets of Apple I computers are rare and sell for high prices at auction.

Complete and incomplete sets of Apple I computers are rare and sell for high prices at auction.

Often collected for preservation by museums and collectors, the Apple I is highly sought after.

Often collected for preservation by museums and collectors, the Apple I is highly sought after.