This Photographer Recreates Literature's Most Iconic Meals

How do you picture Little Red Riding Hood's basket, Alice in Wonderland's tea party, Les Miserables' stolen loaf of or even Proust's madeleine?

Attempting to stay as faithful to the text as possible, French photographer Charles Roux - mostly inspired by literature, art and cinema - recreated literature's most iconic meals, feasts, banquets and picnics.

This task required a large amount of work, and the process began way back in 2014. To stay faithful to the author's work, the artist even found antique objects and the perfect location to accurately capture the book's vision.

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here the mad tea marty with the Hatter and the Hare, from the English novels "Alice's adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass" by Lewis Carroll.

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll (Photo: Charles Roux)

 

From Proust's madeleine to Narnia

The photographer even cooked all the meals for the shoot. Exploring new recipes such as C.S. Lewis' Narnia loukoums, or Herman Melville's Moby Dick clam chowder.

The artist explains each piece requires a different amount of work. While some dishes are barely described, others are highly detailed, such as in Virginia Woolf's work for exemple. Charles Roux tells Slate:

 

“It’s easier, in a way, because you can picture it more clearly, but that’s also difficult because you need to follow every item that’s described, from the blue flower-patterned tablecloth to the fruit in the purple fruit bowl. So I don’t think it’s necessarily easier to follow the descriptions in the books, because it’s more creatively limiting. I had more fun doing Goldilocks and The Three Bears because it was more improvisation.”

 

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here a sancocho dish with dead flowers and tropical fruits, from teh Colombian novel "Love in the times of cholera" (El amor en los tiempos del colera) by Gabriel Garcia Marquez.

Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here a childhood scene at gloomy Lowood School, when Jane Eyre and Helen Burns share a seed-cake and enjoy the heat of a fire, from the English novel "Jane Eyre" by Charlotte Brontë.

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë (Photo: Charles Roux)

Les Misérables (Victor Hugo)

Les Misérables by Victor Hugo (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here in Gregor Samsa's bedroom, the rotten food and bowl of milk, from the Czech novel "The Metamorphpsis" (Die Verwandlung) by Franz Kafka

The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here in the Spouter-inn, the chapter dedicated to the clam chowder, from the American novel "Moby Dick, or the Whale" by Herman Melville

Moby Dick by Herman Melville (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here a snowy scene when Edmond tastes the Turkish Delights from the Queen, in the fantasy world of Narnia, from the Irish novel "The Chronicles of Narnia : The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe" by Clive Staples Lewis.

The Chronicles of Narnia de Clive Staples Lewis (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here a threatening forest in which the galette and the jar of butter lie with the red velvet coat, from the French tale "Little Red Riding Hood" (Le Petit Chaperon Rouge) by Charles Perrault

Little Red Riding Hood by Charles Perrault (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here a watery gruel in the orphanage, from the English novel "Oliver Twist" by Charles Dickens

Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens (Photo: Charles Roux)

From 'Fictitious Feasts', work about food scenes in literature. Here the scene of the reminiscence withe the madeleine, from the volume "Swann's Way" (Du côté de chez Swann), part of the French novel "Remembrance of Things Past" (A la recherche du temps perdu) by Marcel Proust.

Du côté de chez Swann by Marcel Proust (Photo: Charles Roux)

Visit Charles Roux' website to see the entire project.

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